Pakar bedah, Dr Nur Amalina Che Bakri hari ini berkesempatan untuk menyambut hari lebaran bersama keluarga dan kekasihnya.

Menurut Amalina, pada raya pertama lalu dia terlalu sibuk dengan urusan kerja seterusnya beri memberi fokus kepada proses pembedahan bayi Ainul Mardhiah Ahmad Safiuddin.

Malah, pembedahan tersebut telah berjaya dilakukan Amalina dengan membuang tumor 200 gram (Germ Cell Tumour) di mulut bayi berusia sembilan bulan itu.

“It’s time to post more Eid pictures! I managed to get one day off work on 1st Syawal and that was after finishing a 24-hour shift (didn’t expect that Eid would be on Tuesday in the UK), went back home around 9am, had a few hours sleep then got changed to my baju raya before rushing to the hospital to see baby Ainul and her parents.

“Well, that was my Hari Raya day 😊. Of course, my mom cooked ‘Ayam masak merah’ and ‘nasi tomato’, it was DEELIICIOUSSS. 🤤🤤🤤 (p/s: sampin dia terlondeh, I don’t know how to ikat,” kongsi Amalina. 

Memilih tema biru tua, Amalina bersama kekasihnya kelihatan cantik dan kacak mengenakan baju kurung moden dan baju melayu.

Terdahulu, Amalina bersama ibu bapa Ainul meraikan hari raya bersama pada 1 Syawal di sebuah hospital di London.

Untuk makluman, Amalina bersama pakar doktor bedah plastik pediatrik dan craniofacial, Dr Juling Ong, yang juga seorang daripada empat pakar perubatan yang terlibat dalam pembedahan tersebut.

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Alhamdulillah, Ainul, you’re strong baby girl! 😭 After about 5 hours of battling in theatre, the tumour (weighing 200g) was successfully removed. You could not imagine how anxious I was, whilst in theatre. Such a tiny baby, so delicate, so beautiful — “don’t worry baby, everyone is here to help you”. Because it was such a high risk operation, a lot of preparations needed to be done to ensure that baby Ainul would be safe. A lot of planning, a lot of scans, a lot of meetings and a lot of patience. The team included surgeons from various specialties (including craniofacial, plastics and head and neck consultants) led by Prof David Dunway and Mr Juling Ong (also Malaysian-born). They’re very experienced in their own respective field. I was very honoured to be part of the surgical team. Thank you to everyone who made this possible, it was a team effort! Ainul is currently being monitored post-operatively and she’s stable. When I stepped out from theatre and saw Ainul’s parents, I couldn’t control my emotions. It was a mixed feeling, such an emotional journey and an uplifting experience at the same time. Ainul, Wani and Safi are like my own family. Let’s pray for Ainul’s recovery. Thank you for all your prayers. 🙏🏽 (Consent was given by Ainul’s parents for this story to be on IG) @_nrlerwani @ahmadsafiudinn

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Mission Baby Ainul — From the bottom of my heart, I would like to express my gratitude to all these people who were involved in the mission. London Surgical team: Mr Juling Ong and Prof David Dunway (Craniofacial/Plastics and Paediatric Surgeons), Head and Neck Surgeon, anaesthetic team. Scrub nurses and ward nurses. Paediatric Oncological team. Dr Gunalan Arumugam and Col (Rtd) Dato Dr Jaseemuddeen Abu Baker, 2 anaesthetists from Malaysia who accompanied Ainul on the plane. Dato Dr Razin from Malaysia Airlines and the crew. En Jefri from HICOM. Fellow Malaysians in the UK — Dr Fahja Ismail, Dr Najmiah Khaiessa Ahmad and Dr Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi, who assisted Ainul’s parents with emotional support, finding accommodation and settling in. It was such a huge challenge to ensure that Baby Ainul could fly to London. Thank you! Without all of you this mission would be impossible. It’s truly a team effort. And last but not least, thank you Malaysians for your prayers and donations. #MalaysiaBoleh

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Back on call today! 👩🏻‍⚕️ Some surgical info for you — What is appendicitis? Appendicitis is a painful swelling and inflammation of the appendix. The appendix is a small, thin pouch about 5 to 10cm (2 to 4 inches) long. It's connected to the large intestine, where poo forms. Appendicitis typically starts with a pain in the middle of your tummy (abdomen) that may come and go. Within hours, the pain travels to your lower right-hand side, where the appendix is usually located, and becomes constant and severe. Pressing on this area, coughing or walking may make the pain worse. If you have appendicitis, you may also have other symptoms, including: * feeling sick (nausea) * being sick * loss of appetite * constipation or diarrhoea * a high temperature and a flushed face Further tests also need to be done to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out other conditions such as: * a blood test to look for signs of infection * a pregnancy test for women * a urine test to rule out other conditions, such as a bladder infection * an ultrasound scan to see if the appendix is swollen and to investigate the ovaries (only if indicated) * a CT scan (only if indicated) If you have appendicitis, your appendix will usually need to be removed as soon as possible. This operation is known as an appendicectomy or appendectomy (which is normally done by keyhole surgery – laparoscopic). Surgery is often also recommended if there's a chance you have appendicitis but it's not been possible to make a clear diagnosis. This is because it's considered safer to remove the appendix than risk it bursting. In humans, the appendix does not perform any important function and removing it does not cause any long-term problems. (Source: www.nhs.uk) #NHS #independentwomencan #ilooklikeasurgeon #generalsurgery

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Foto : Instagram Amalina